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the u.s. passed 22 years ago. but 38 u. rep u.n. treaty leaving it five votes short of ratification. not even a rare visit by former republican senator bob dole who just before the vote made a difference. he's 89, appeared frail this his wheelchair and disabled from war injuries, came to the chamber to show support for this treaty. rick santorum led the charge against the treaty. he and some other republicans warned it would jeopardize u.s. sovereignty and personal freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what i in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a tr that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's not true. the t
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
doesn't pick u.n. ambassador susan rice. >>> elsewhere, president obama has drawn a hard line on tax increases for the wealthiest of americans. rejecting an offer that republicans claim is as good as it's going to get. tracie potts joins us with the latest on this. good morning. >> reporter: right now it's looking more likely that we could, could, go over that fiscal cliff at the end of the month because right now, negotiations here are at a stand still. president obama talks to the business round table today after telling bloomberg he absolutely won't bunch. the wealthiest americans must pay more. >> we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: he may be in a good position to wait it out. a new poll found more half of americans will blame republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> republicans do not want to touch one hair on the head of one person making over $250,000. that is the rub. >> they've got to come with some specific revenue. they refuse to do that. >> reporter: even other republicans are split on john boehner's plan to avoid tax hikes all together
. then this is the first time that foreign minister met with hillary clinton on assad, met with the u.n. mediator and we're being cautioned this is no break through but there will be follow-up meeting. seems some u.s. officials russia is hedging its bets or beginning to see a future without assad. >> i think that's the case. we've talked about this before, but there is a russian card to be played, to be played by russia itself. they have influence with president assad, they have interests in syria, and i think that they can see the handwriting on the wall that assad is eventually going to go, whether it's in the near term, long term, eventually he's going. you can see the shift in momentum as far as the rebels now starting to gain much greater military success than they have in the past. they've been weapons that have been able to take some helicopters out of the air, shoulder-fired missiles, et cetera. i think they can see the shift taking place and want to be in a position to help negotiate some sort of an acceptable ending to this where they can play the role of a peacemaker. so i think not with stan
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
of the u.n. environment program and we asked him if anything at all could come out of this conference. >> we still have to give you a days ago, and i believe there will be a number of outcomes. the green climate fund, the kyoto protocol extension -- these are fundamental building blocks of an international climate process, but ever since copenhagen, we are pursuing a search for a new framework for global climate cooperation, and doha in itself will not deliver that. we should also recognize that these conferences have not provided us with a single framework, but they have triggered all across the world immense initiatives in the direction of a low-carbon economy, and i think these are also a byproduct of this process, and we need to recognize them because they are part of building our ability to move towards a low-carbon future. nevertheless, doha should at a minimum enable us to keep the process moving forward. in itself, it has not delivered a breakthrough. that is clear. >> that was the head of the united nations' environment program. now we had a championship talk -- soccer, and l
that the north is testing a ballistic missile technology and violating u.n. resolutions and further destablizing the korean peninsula. so many hot spots in the world today to watch as we welcome you on this friday morning to a brand new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer welcome to you at home. good morning to you, again, martha. we're watching the second launch attempt since kim jong-un took over after his father's death a year ago. the last try failed. here is the head of the u.s. pacific command keeping a watch on this. >> we're approaching once again a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution and we encourage and the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together
the report that the u.p. report filed for the u.n.gen assembly when it was highlight, quote, pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights activityist, lawyers, journalist, and opposition activists, and to draw an example from the week's news theres actually what i gas what qualifies in iran for a slight bit of goodness. a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nasarn, and she has in prison since 2010, and the regime imposed a travel ban on her husband and her daughter so she was on a hunger strike for 49 days, and has actually stopped the hunger strike amid word the regime is going to lift the travel ban. so, the victories are small and hard-on and the news is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting mome
failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basic
for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic
. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as th
kerry is firing back at senator rick santorum. it's all about this. opposition to a u.n. treaty. one that a lot of people thought was a no-brainer. it was about the rights of the disabled all over the world. we brought you this story yesterday. senate republicans rejecting this treaty on tuesday despite the fact that one of their own, bob dole, bob dole, a former majority leader, came to the floor in a wheelchair trying to draw support for this treaty. he was being pushed by his wife and made an impassioned plea. senator santorum explained opposition to this treaty in a piece published in "the daily beast." in part he says this. our nation has been been the worldwide leader when it comes to protecting the disabled. we should be telling the u.n. and not the other way around how to ensure dignity and respect for the disabled. effectively saying nobody tells the united states what to do. it sets a very dangerous precedent perhaps for other things. okay. that sounded legitimate until it came out that that's not what the treaty suggests. senator kerry was mincing absolutely no words in sa
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
for the palestinians at the u.n. says it is not looking for way, is now looking for ways to put pressure on israel but it is not at this time considering trade sanctions. as for the palestinians, and this is very interesting, a member of the p.l.o. raised the possibility today that the p.l.o. would consider taking matters, now, to the international criminal court but many sources believe that it is highly unlikely that the palestinian president is given assurances to the united states that will not happen at least in the foreseeable future, but, definitely the palestinians not happy. they are pleased it appears that the world consensus is lining up behind them. >>shepard: thank you from jerusalem. there is a frantic search at home for a sick little girl that doctors say could die if they don't find her very soon. this is surveillance video from a hospital in phoenix. police say that is the 11-year-old cancer patient's mother sneaking her right out of the hospital with potentially deadly piece of equipment localed in her heart. a nurse spotted them leaving and called the police. >> they were actual
don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then
point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most authoritarian regime in gaza are protected by these countries. but that was the result of the way in which the whole thing was handled and i'm not sure that is helpful toward the future. >> rose: let me go back in the past. what exactly did you and mr. abbas negotiate and why did it not hold? >> well, that's a good question. first of all, it didn't hold because at the very end when we were a very, very, very close to conclude an agreement between israel and the palestinians which have -- would have resolve it had historical conflict between the two sides and would have created two states, palestinian state, you recognize boundaries and, of course, the state of israel is the home of the jewish people. in recognized bound rei
by the plo which recently after four years of not negotiating with the us rail ris went to the u.n. and asked for upgraded status. do the israelis have anyone to negotiability a peace process with at this point, and if they didn't negotiate, and let's suppose that abbas came tomorrow to negotiate these process after four years of refusing to do so without concessions in advance, could he sign a pape or that would be at all -- a paper that would be at all meaningful? would he be able to bring hamas into it which is dedicate today the extermination of israel? is there any way to believe that israel could have a separate peace or have peace for the -- before the rest of the world settles this mess with islamism? >> well, it's possible, but it's very hard at this point to imagine. it would not come easily for all the questions, for all the reasons that your questions embody. i mean, in the first place, um, right now israel faces a palestinian people that are divided between two governments. so making peace with one wouldn't give them the security or the confidence to take the risks that they will
.s. assistance to undercut, must not continue to undercut our key interest in the region. second, the u.n. should consider initiating security cooperation to linwood training and intelligence sharing with heavily vetted opposition groups that are committed to the space process and universally accepted human rights and human rights principles. i understand organizations like the syrian support could have developed criteria and secure commitments from commanders on the ground to abide by the internationally accepted human rights norms and conventions relative to the behavior during armed conflict. we should make sure that if we take this step we ensure that that happens. third of the u.s. should consider measures that would hamper the ability of the syrian air force to conduct aerial attacks on civilians. the finalize the patriot missile batteries which is an important step in the right direction. while defensive in nature of things that these batteries are an important display of international solidarity with turkey and the syrian people. the administration should also examine and assess other way
neighbor to the north, being turkey. security concerns are prompting the u.n. to announce it is pulling nonessential personnel out of syria. want to bring in fran townsend, our cnn national security contributor and member of the cia external advisory committee. and, fran, good to see you. let's talk about these chemical weapons because we know that in the past, what, three, three have been, i guess, two, two different times the u.s. has seen syria move its chemical weapons around. but intelligence suggests this time the movement is different. how so? >> well, there was an american official speaking on background, obviously, to a new york times reporter who didn't describe this as movement of the chemical weapons. what makes it different this time was it was described as the syrians taking steps in preparation for use. that's far more serious and far more concerning to american and regional officials if syria is undertaking activity that looks like the preparation for the deployment of these chemical weapons. remember, you mentioned, brooke, turkey. also jordan. we have -- there are regi
's very hard to say when it is then his regime will collapse. host: the secretary general of the u.n., anders rasmussen, said that "it would be completely unacceptable for the whole international community and if anyone resort to these terrible weapons, i would expect an immediate reaction from the international community." what would that reaction be? guest: military intervention. we have heard very strong warnings. the words of not been directly spelled out, it's likely that is exactly what would need to happen. host: led by the u.s. or another nation? guest: the u.s. would clearly playing a leading role. host: front page of a "the new york times." the story points out the loan syrian rebel group with the stamp of approval from all qaeda has become one of the most effective fighting forces was a stark challenge to the u.s. and other countries. explain. guest: this is a longstanding concern and one reason why the obama administration has said they're not interested in sending sophisticated weapons and to syria. the organization referred to in the article is considered one of the mos
brash, but he was of u.n. ambassador -- again, query whether that was a good match -- and she would be u.k. ambassador, but they say she doesn't want the job. she's happily installed over at voc and i hear -- can at vogue, and i hear working on a piece on you. >> me? i'll be on jon stewart with this, guaranteed. [laughter] megyn: thanks for being here, stu. we're taking your thoughts on that, follow me on twitter @megyn kelly, let me know what you think about ambassador win tour. >>> what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but as police made a dramatic discovery in the trunk of this car. that okays next. >>> plus, an estimated 75,000 soldiers to capture syria's chemical weapons supply. just ahead, why that is a growing concern as we get reports the syrians are mixing up batches of nerve agents right now. megyn: well, what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but after police in kentucky discovered what looked like an attempted kidnapping. trace gallagher live in l.a. with the details. trace? >> reporter: sean loamer says he was just closing up where he wor
. without having to go through congress were without having to get ratification of the u.n. treaty. megyn: it is another system. it looks kind of like cap-and-trade from what i'm reading. where have you, and west virginia, if you want to have a certain number of coal power plants come you have to trade -- there can only be one toll number of omissions and the states have to work it out amongst themselves. >> that is unlikely to go into effect. it would be too hard to pull that out. that is what this group is talking about. the epa really doesn't need to worry about that. they can just crack down on industry on their own. congressman stutzman, and there are enough democrats bases that may join with republicans to push back the epa. in all likelihood, the president found the sweet spot where he can go out there and his team can go out there and really crack down on carbon emissions and deal with global warming, but do it in a way that doesn't require approval. megyn: what happens if you violate the new epa standards? reporter: the people that run the plants will be fined into oblivion. it w
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
, moscow's support in places like the u.n. security council, the iranians are very worried about upsetting russia's interests in the south caucuses. this is best reflected by iran's position in regards to armenia and georgia where russian interests are strongest. i have provided more detail in my testimony and provided some examples. second, i think we have a failure in tehran's so-called big brother approach which i think is heavily tainted with an ideological syndrome. so i would quickly say it's not just that iran doesn't want to be active in the south caucuses because it fears that the russians might be upset, but it's also because of a failure of its model as a political invitation that is extended over the last 20 years to these three countries, particularly azerbaijan. where russian interests are least sensitive n my view, iran has also failed to gain traction. this is thanks to -- excuse me. where iran has basically insisted on sharing its anti-american and aunt-western portions, and this is a call which the authorities in azerbaijan have repeatedly rejected, i think they would hav
that is occurring and they're now too afraid to return. u.n. secretary general ban ki moon visited this refugee camp in jordan, this is yesterday, and or own cnn's ivan watson is in a sprawling refugee camp on the border with turkey. >> reporter: we're in a camp of around 7,000 syrians on the edge of syria. these people, some of them have been waiting a month, two months to be allowed into turkey. turkey says its refugee camps are full right now. these people have been supplied tents. they get about two meals, hot meals, a day, but everybody here complains that the water is seeping into their tents, and none of these tents really have heat either, so you can see how people are trying to heat up their tea and water, making fires right outside these shelters. now, this is just a fraction of the hoards of people who have been displaced by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary
voted because they, quote, hate the u.n. >>> tragic ending to a month's long search for two missing cousins. coming up next, the news here today on these iowa girls last seen in july when they left for a bike ride. [ man ] in hong kong, on my way to the board meeting... anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> the families of two missing iowa girls preparing for the worst right now. hunters found two bodies in a wooded area just yesterday afternoon. near the area where 10-year-old lyric cook and 8-year-old cousin elizabeth collins last seen in july. >> i can tell you that we do have two bodies that had been found. right now, it's looking that the outcome
, the u.n. i understand the frustrations of the israelis and the presen situation. but the fact is, when all of that frustration is done, you have to get back to the reality. and the reality is there is only one way of stabilizing the situation and that is getting back to a credible negotiation with a frame work shaping it that allows us to negotiate a two-state solution. i still believe despite people saying there's no way it can happen, it's the only answer. >> is there any hope in the immediate future, those talks, direct face-to-face negotiations between the israelis and palestinians will get off the ground? >> it's possible. we've discussed this many times, wolf. most of the time we've been talking about the latest impact. but president obama has been re-elected here in the u.s. i know he feels deeply about this issue. he regards peace between israelis and palestinians as a genuine strategic interest of the united states. and we're going to have i think a fresh opportunity to go back to this issue to try and grip it and frame it in the right way and we've got to try. i always say to
. >>> anybody wants to go over the cliff. >> the new concerns the country is headed for the fiscal cliff. n [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow, you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver only from at&t u-verse. get u-verse tv for $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. >>> ra little bit of patchy fog -- a little bit of patchy fog. mostly sunny, partly cloudy. rain returns to the north bay on tuesday. >>> all right. we have some breaking news. buckingham palace says prince william and the duchess of cambridge are expecting a baby. their first. ever since they got married, there's been speculation about when they would have their first child and the duchess has made it no secret that they with like to have a fami
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